ONLINE ART FAIR NOW LIVE! Photography, art, and more. Begin here RRP Closed on Fridays
COVID-19 Response & Continuity PlansDetails Hide Notice

Cold Weather Inkjet Printing

Read About the Problems and Solutions for Cold Weather Inkjet Printing


Cold Weather Printing Tips

The Problem

The temperatures are dropping around the country as winter hits with full force. To maintain a comfortable environment, we turn up those thermostats and increase the output of warm, dry air into our homes and offices.

Though many people have humidifers for relief from the dryness, most do not. This can result in a number of inkjet printer problems.

The Reason

All papers retain of small amount (3-5%) of moisture to prevent them from being brittle. Most paper is manufactured in a moisture environment of 45-55%. If the air surrounding the paper falls to a level of 25-35% from our office and home heating, it will attempt to regain balance by losing some of its moisture content. Many Red River inkjet papers are only coated for printing on one side, or have different coatings on front and back. When the paper loses or gains water, one side of the paper can flex more than the other resulting in curl and static problems.

The result is curled sheets of inkjet paper that will not feed consistently in your printer. Papers that are printable on one side experience the greatest change in curl as the humidity changes.

Some Solutions

Purchase a hygrometer. Keep it in your print room and use it as your primary reference. While outside humidity is important, the humidity levels in your home or office are what truly count. At right is a good quality, basic hygrometer - the one used in our offices and production facility.

By using a small room humidifier where you print, a great deal of feeding problems in the winter can be avoided. An improvement of only 10% from 28% to 38% can make a big difference.

Static (which causes sheets of paper to stick together) can be reduced by rubbing fabric softener sheets on the paper before feeding. Although this may sound strange, printing press operators have been doing this trick for years.

We hope that this is helpful and informative.